A few days later came Cao Cao’s two cousins

A few days later came Cao Cao’s two cousins, Cao Ren and Cao Hong, each with one thousand followers. these two were accomplished horsemen and trained in the use of arms.

then drill began, and Wei Hong spent his treasure freely in buying clothing, armor, flags, and banners. From all sides poured in gifts of grain.

When Yuan Shao received Cao Cao’s call to arms, he collected all those under his command to the number of thirty thousand. Then he marched from Bohai to Qiao to take the oath to Cao Cao. Next a manifesto was issued:

“Cao Cao and his associates, moved by a sense of duty, now make this proclamation. Dong Zhuo defies Heaven and Earth. He is destroying the state and injuring his prince. He pollutes the Palace and oppresses the people. He is vicious and cruel. His crimes are heaped up. Now we have received a secret command to call up soldiers, and we are pledged to cleanse the empire and destroy the evil-doers. We will raise a volunteer army and exert all our efforts to maintain the dynasty and succor the people. Respond to this, O Nobles, by mustering your soldiers.”

Many from every side answered the summons as the following list shows:

1. Governor of Nanyang——Yuan Shu

2. Imperial Protector of Jizhou Region——Han Fu

3. Imperial Protector of Yuzhou Region——Kong Zhou

4. Imperial Protector of Yanzhou Region——Liu Dai

5. Governor of Henei——Wang Kuang

6. Governor of Chenliu——Zhang Miao

7. Governor of Dongjun——Qiao Mao

8. Governor of Shanyang——Yuan Yi

9. Lord of Jibei——Bao Xin

10. Governor of Beihai——Kong Rong

11. Governor of Guangling ——Zhang Chao

12. Imperial Protector of Xuzhou Region——Tao Qian

13. Governor of Xiliang——Ma Teng

14. Governor of Beiping——Gongsun Zan

15. Governor of Shangdang——Zhang Yang

16. Governor of Changsha——Sun Jian

17. Governor of Bohai——Yuan Shao

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these contingents varied in size, from ten thousand to thirty thousand, but each was complete in itself with its officers, civil and military, and battle-leaders. They were heading for Capital Luoyang.

grass on the river bank and hid. The soldiers scattered

He Miao looked around:

 

 

His enemies hemmed him in on every side.

He was hacked to pieces.

Yuan Shu bade his soldiers scatter and seek out all

the families of the eunuchs, sparing none.

In that slaughter many beardless men were killed in error.

Cao Cao set himself to extinguish the fires.

He then begged Empress He to undertake the

direction of affairs, and soldiers were sent to

pursue Zhang Rang and rescue the young

Emperor and the young Prince of Chenliu.

Meanwhile, Zhang Rang and Duan Gui had

hustled away the Emperor and the Prince.

They burst through the smoke and fire and

traveled without stopping till they reached the

Beimang Hills. It was then the third watch.

They heard a GREat shouting behind them

and saw soldiers in pursuit. Their leader,

Min Gong, a commander in Henan,

was shouting, “Traitors, stop, stop!”

Zhang Rang, seeing that he was lost,

jumped into the river, where he was drowned.

the two boys ignorant of the meaning of all this

confusion and terrified out of their senses,

dared not utter a cry. They crept in among the rank

grass on the river bank and hid. The soldiers scattered

in all directions but failed to find them.

So they remained till the fourth watch,

shivering with cold from the drenching dew and

very hungry. They lay down in the thick grass and

wept in each other’s arms, silently,

lest anyone should discover them.

“This is no a place to stay in,”

said Prince Xian. “We must find some way out.”

So the two children knotted their clothes

together and managed to crawl up the bank.

They were in a thicket of thorn bushes,

and it was quite dark. They could not see any

path. They were in despair when, all at once,

millions of fireflies sprang up all about them

and circled in the air in front of the Emperor.

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Yuan Shu bade his soldiers scatter and seek out all

Yuan Shu bade his soldiers scatter and seek out all

the families of the eunuchs, sparing none.

In that slaughter many beardless men were killed in error.

Cao Cao set himself to extinguish the fires.

He then begged Empress He to undertake the

direction of affairs, and soldiers were sent to

pursue Zhang Rang and rescue the young

Emperor and the young Prince of Chenliu.

Meanwhile, Zhang Rang and Duan Gui had

hustled away the Emperor and the Prince.

They burst through the smoke and fire and traveled

without stopping till they reached the Beimang Hills.

It was then the third watch. They heard a

GREat shouting behind them and saw soldiers in

pursuit. Their leader, Min Gong, a commander in

Henan, was shouting, “Traitors, stop, stop!”

Zhang Rang, seeing that he was lost,

jumped into the river, where he was drowned.

the two boys ignorant of the meaning of all

this confusion and terrified out of their senses,

dared not utter a cry. They crept in among the rank

grass on the river bank and hid.

The soldiers scattered in all directions but f

ailed to find them. So they remained till the

fourth watch, shivering with cold from the

drenching dew and very hungry.

They lay down in the thick grass and

wept in each other’s arms, silently,

lest anyone should discover them.

“This is no a place to stay in,”

said Prince Xian. “We must find some way out.”

So the two children knotted their clothes

together and managed to crawl up the bank.

They were in a thicket of thorn bushes, and it was

quite dark. They could not see any path. They were

in despair when, all at once, millions

of fireflies sprang up all about them and circled

in the air in front of the Emperor.

“God is helping us,” said Prince Xian.

they followed whither the fireflies

led and gradually got into a road. They walked

till their feet were too sore to go further,

when, seeing a heap of straw near the road,

they crept to it and lay down.

This heap of straw was close to a farm house.

In the night, as the farmer was sleeping, he saw

in a vision two bright red suns drop behind his

dwelling. Alarmed by the portent, he hastily

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dressed and went forth to look about him.

Then he saw a bright light shooting up from

a heap of straw. He hastened thither and

then saw two youths lying behind it.

Zhu Jun returned to Capital

Zhu Jun returned to Capital Luoyang,

was promoted to the General of the Flying Cavalry*,

and received the governorship of Henan. He did not forget those who had helped him to

win victory. Thus he reported the merits of Liu Bei and Sun Jian to the Throne.

Sun Jian, having influential friends and connections to support him, quickly got an appointment

to a post of Commander of Changsha and went to assume the new office. But Liu Bei,

in spite of Zhu Jun’s memorial, waited in vain for preferment, and the three brothers became very sad.

Walking along one day in the capital, Liu Bei met a court official, Zhang Jun, to whom

he related his services and told his sorrows. Zhang Jun was much surprised at

this neglect and one day at court spoke to the Emperor about it.

Said he, “The Yellow Scarves rebelled because the eunuchs sold offices and bartered ranks.

There was employment only for their friends, punishment only for their enemies.

This led to rebellion. Wherefore it would be well to slay the Ten Eunuchs and expose

their heads and proclaim what had been done throughout the whole empire.

Then reward the worthy. Thereby the land would be wholly tranquil.”

But the eunuchs fiercely opposed this and said Zhang Jun was insulting the Emperor,

and the Emperor bade the guards thrust Zhang Jun out.

However, the eunuchs took counsel together and one said, “Surely someone who

rendered some service against rebels resents being passed over.”

So they caused a list of unimportant people to be prepared for preferment by and by.

Among them was Liu Bei, who received the post of magistrate of the county of Anxi, to

which he proceeded without delay after disbanding his army and sending them home

to their villages. He retained two dozens or so as escort.

The three brothers reached Anxi, and soon the administration of the county was so

reformed and the rule so wise that in a month there was no law-breaking. The three

brothers lived in harmony, eating at the same table and sleeping on the same couch.

But when Liu Bei was in public sessions or in company of others,

Guan Yu and Zhang Fei would stand in attendance, were it even a whole day.

Four months after their arrival, there came out a general order for the reduction

of the number of military officers holding civil posts, and Liu Bei began to fear that

he would be among those thrown out. In due course the inspecting official, Du Biao

by name, arrived and was met at the boundary. But to the polite obeisance of Liu Bei,

he made no return, save a wave of his whip as he sat on his horse.

This made Guan Yu and Zhang Fei furious. But worse was to follow.

When the inspector had arrived at his lodging, he took his seat on the dais,

leaving Liu Bei standing below. After a long time he addressed Liu Bei.

I challenge what may come

I challenge what may come

Cui Hao
PASSING THROUGH HUAYIN
Lords of the capital, sharp, unearthly,
The Great Flower’s three points pierce through heaven.
Clouds are parting above the Temple of the Warring Emperor,
Rain dries on the mountain, on the Giant’s Palm.
Ranges and rivers are the strength of this western gate,
Whence roads and trails lead downward into China.
…O pilgrim of fame, O seeker of profit,
Why not remain here and lengthen your days?


Zu Yong
LOOKING TOWARD AN INNER GATE
OF THE GREAT WALL
My heart sank when I headed north from Yan Country
To the camps of China echoing ith bugle and drum.
…In an endless cold light of massive snow,
Tall flags on three borders rise up like a dawn.
War-torches invade the barbarian moonlight,
Mountain-clouds like chairmen bear the Great Wall from the sea.
…Though no youthful clerk meant to be a great general,
I throw aside my writing-brush —
Like the student who tossed off cap for a lariat,
I challenge what may come.


Li Qi
A FAREWELL TO WEI WAN
The travellers’ parting-song sounds in the dawn.
Last night a first frost came over the river;
And the crying of the wildgeese grieves my sad heart
Bounded by a gloom of cloudy mountains….
Here in the Gate City, day will flush cold
And washing-flails quicken by the gardens at twilight —
How long shall the capital content you,
Where the months and the years so vainly go by?


Cui Shu
A CLIMB ON THE MOUNTAIN HOLIDAY
TO THE TERRACE WHENCE ONE SEES THE MAGICIAN
A POEM SENT TO VICE-PREFECT LU
The Han Emperor Wen bequeathed us this terrace
Which I climb to watch the coming dawn.
Cloudy peaks run northward in the three Jin districts,
And rains are blowing westward through the two Ling valleys.
…Who knows but me about the Guard at the Gate,
Or where the Magician of the River Bank is,
Or how to find that magistrate, that poet,
Who was as fond as I am of chrysanthemums and winecups?